Clovis Community College puts on blood drive, promotes random acts of kindness to honor former student Molly Griffin

mollyday

Featured photo contributed – Molly Griffin

Paul Schlesinger | Reporter
@PaulSch_Photog

The Clovis Community College community continued the legacy of a former student killed last year by a drunk driver by giving blood and offering other random acts of kindness.

The second annual Molly Day on Aug. 26 was a culmination of a week that encouraged the college community to spread kindness in memory of Molly Griffin, 23, a nurse who was killed on Feb. 21, 2015, and had a passion for doing random acts of kindness, college spokeswoman Stephanie Babb said. The day was chosen as it would have been Molly’s birthday.

“Spreading kindness doesn’t have to cost a penny,” Babb said. “ It can be a simple thank you or hello or opening the door for someone. A single act can influence dozens more.”

The Griffin Family released a statement that said it was honored and grateful to have the support of the community; and they also offered their heartfelt thanks to everyone that shared a random act of kindness to remember and celebrate the life of Molly. Doris Griffin, Molly’s mother, is the admissions and records manager at Clovis Community College.

Students and community members chose to celebrate and remember Molly by giving the gift of life: blood.

Patrick Stumpf, student activities coordinator, felt that a blood drive was the best way to continue Molly’s legacy.

“She was one of our former students and we want to do everything that we can to make sure that her kindness is not forgotten,” he said.

Stumpf said the community came out in droves to honor her legacy as it was the biggest blood drive they ever had at Clovis Community College – it well exceeding their goal of 24 pints of blood.

Stumpf added that students had other opportunities through the week to offer a random act of kindness on campus.

These moments included: donating children’s books, writing notes of encouragement to members of the military, the college’s student government provided coffee and doughnuts to students, simply paying for the person behind you at the coffee shop, buying water bottles and handing them out on campus, just buying coffee for their children’s teachers.

“Just many different things to help many different people,” Stumpf said. “I think it’s the best way to honor such an amazing person.”

Angelita Zaragoza, a student adviser, decided to give blood for the first time after witnessing the random acts of kindness through the week and after hearing how a passenger in the wreck that killed Molly, narrowly survived the crash, by receiving an emergency blood transfusion.  

“She’s with us today because she was able to receive six pints of blood,” Zaragoza said. “So it’s very important to donate blood and to help people live on.”

Dean Eller, president and CEO of the Central California Blood Center, who was in attendance at the blood drive, said it gave him hope to see such a large turnout.

“It gives me hope for young people all over the place to see what they do and the enthusiasm they have in giving blood and doing what is probably the most wonderful act of kindness that you could give, and that’s saving another person’s life,” Eller said.

Eller said the turnout was phenomenal and was much greater than what they have on a usual blood drive.

“You can just see the enthusiasm in everybody and you can see that they get it,” Eller said.

Eller said that when a crash victim is sent to the hospital, receiving a blood transfusion at that moment is the best hope for saving them.

“When you think of somebody that’s in the emergency room getting a pint or multiple pints of blood and you think about ‘are you going to save them for a lifetime or you are you going to save them just for an hour?’” Eller said. “And even the donation that goes into a person in the emergency room that saves them just for an hour, what it means to that family is unbelieveable. They get one more hour to spend with their loved one, we hope for a lifetime, but even that one last moment to say goodbye is phenomenal.”